RBS 6 Nations 2012

This entry was posted on Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

Cue public outcry about bankers… 

Rugby, more than any other sport, is all about the World Cup. Footballers have their club sides and various regional competitions. Cricket’s World Cup goes on too long, and features a dying format of the game. Hockey’s World Cup is a poor relation of the Olympic tournament. But in the world of egg-chasing, the world rotates around its cup.

A new four-year cycle begins this weekend for the Northern Hemisphere nations, with countries either looking to continue where they left off in New Zealand (France and Wales), make up for shameful performances (Ireland and England), or simply make up the numbers (Scotland and Italy).

Whilst one might be tempted to use the recent William Webb Ellis as a form guide, our advice is not to. Post World Cup, as mentioned above, a cycle starts anew. Managers come and go, players retire and young blood gets its wicked way.

Previous tournaments broadly bear this out. England reached the final in Autumn 2007, but the spring of 2008 saw Wales (who had been humiliated by Fiji in a Pool match) top the 6 Nations table. England won the 2003 World Cup, but could only manage third in the 2004 6 Nations, behind Ireland and a rampant France (thrashed by England in a semi-final 4 months earlier.)

In other words, this time around, ignore the potential of the Welsh and the talent of the French, and look instead to steady, old Ireland to win the RBS 6 Nations, available at 5.6 on Betfair. Just don’t mention Fred the Shred.

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